This Way of Life is Not Negotiable.

Give me some love.  

Tales of Aaron, a 24 year old coffee loving misfit and his dog, working to make the world a better place. Omaha, NE."KID, YOU'LL MOVE MOUNTAINS!" - Dr. Suess


sometimes I admit the strangest things to who-areyoureally and I wonder why she, or even anyone, is my friend. lolololol

— 11 hours ago with 2 notes
"

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

"
— 19 hours ago with 25860 notes

OMG ITS A QUARTER TO 6AM AND I AM STILL AWAKE BECAUSE MY NEIGHBOR’S’ DOMESTIC DISPUTE AT 3AM WOKE ME UP.

I loathe my neighbors so much. Next time, I am burning their house down. No need to get the cops involved.

— 19 hours ago with 1 note
#I should delete this  #because it'll eventually probably be incriminating 
langleav:

mc-squidward:

doragray:

jennlferlawrence:

frostingpeetaswounds:

i laughed so hard at the “i don’t know” and “something is wrong”

the twilight one is like abstract poetry

If you read it all together it’s like the most awkward, tense conversation ever.
"My name is Katniss Everdeen," I sighed. Nothing happened.
"I don’t know," he sighed.
Harry looked around, I shake my head and shrugged.
Harry stared. “I am seventeen years old.”
I frowned and he waited.
"My home is District 12."
Harry chuckled and said nothing. Now I wish I had.
I laughed. We looked at each other. I swallowed hard. He shrugged. Harry blinked and hesitates. I flinched.
He looked around. “I’m not really surprised.”
I took a deep breath, something he didn’t have last time. “Something is wrong.”
He didn’t answer. He stood up.

OMG


LOL

langleav:

mc-squidward:

doragray:

jennlferlawrence:

frostingpeetaswounds:

i laughed so hard at the “i don’t know” and “something is wrong”

the twilight one is like abstract poetry

If you read it all together it’s like the most awkward, tense conversation ever.

"My name is Katniss Everdeen," I sighed. Nothing happened.

"I don’t know," he sighed.

Harry looked around, I shake my head and shrugged.

Harry stared. “I am seventeen years old.”

I frowned and he waited.

"My home is District 12."

Harry chuckled and said nothing. Now I wish I had.

I laughed. We looked at each other. I swallowed hard. He shrugged. Harry blinked and hesitates. I flinched.

He looked around. “I’m not really surprised.”

I took a deep breath, something he didn’t have last time. “Something is wrong.”

He didn’t answer. He stood up.

OMG

LOL

— 19 hours ago with 413068 notes

purifieddd:

bethrevis:

you could kill a man in any of these dresses, and pretty sure no jury would convict you. those are killing-men dresses, that’s what i’m saying

OMFG

(Source: thedaymarecollection, via romancingthelookyloos)

— 1 day ago with 322637 notes

baelor:

SCARY MOVIES SET IN HOUSES ARE THE WORST

LIVE IN A HOUSE

(via makeeters)

— 1 day ago with 511943 notes

simplynebraska:

Joslyn Castle in Omaha, NE

Built in 1903, the $250,000 ($6 million today) 4-story Scottish Baronial Mansion was home to Nebraska’s wealthiest people - George and Sarah Joslyn. George died in 1916 and Sarah in 1940. The castle is part of the National Register of Historic Places. Served as headquarters for Omaha Public Schools from 1944 to 1989. The castle is now managed by the Joslyn Castle Trust.

(via samthegreat8)

— 1 day ago with 6 notes